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Abstract

The writers in this issue of Occasional Papers advocate for models of inclusion that support children’s capabilities and challenge systemic inequities based on ableism and cultural biases. They examine the complex and changing nature of collaboration between general and special educators in inclusion settings. Underlying these essays, though not always explicitly stated, is recognition that the fields of special education and disability studies can deepen and inform each other.

Author Biography

Valentine Burr is faculty at Bank Street College of Education. She teaches courses and supervises fieldwork students in the childhood general and special education program. Prior to coming to Bank Street, she was a special education teacher in both self-contained and inclusion settings at the elementary, middle, and high school levels.

 

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